The Book Thief

The Book Thief

Some books have so much depth, character, and impact that hoping to tackle them in a single 30-minute segment is ridiculous. Luckily, we knew this would be the case going into The Book Thief, a novel that’s been heralded by readers and critics alike, and featured on prominent book lists since its release in 2005. Despite all of his good intentions, Andy hadn’t read it. Samara, on the other hand, had read it upwards of 10 times and always wept at the conclusion. A collision of these two mighty forces was inevitable.



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The author’s decision to make the figure of Death the narrator of the story is probably the most-discussed feature of the novel, but there are plenty of other interesting items to consider: the beautiful, chilling depictions of major events of WWII, the tender relationships between Liesel and her foster parents, and or Liesel and childhood friend Rudy; or the heroic, hopeless trials of Max Vandenburg, the Jewish boxer hiding in Liesel’s basement. We barely scratched the surface in our half hour.

As the second part of our conversation about Marcus Zusak’s recent work, we’re going to read his newest novel, Bridge of Clay, and see how it feels alongside the seemingly incomparable The Book Thief. We’d love to hear about your experiences with either or both books, and if you have additional recommendations.

Thanks for listening. Don’t forget to drop us a line and tell us how we’re doing. ;)


The Mortification of Fovea Munson

The Mortification of Fovea Munson